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We have membership options to fit any budget! Including Junior Future Star Memberships - just $299!

Unable to attend? Feel free to make a donation to the event in support of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Ottawa Hospital. 

Tax receipts will be issued for donations over $15.00. Tax receipts will be issued and mailed to the name and address entered at check-out. 

More about the NICU...

Extremely premature babies require complex care, life support, and round-the-clock monitoring until they reach full-term (39 to 40 weeks). For these little babies to grow and develop they need conditions that mimic the mother’s womb: warmth, oxygen, food and quiet. We attempt to recreate these conditions by artificial means. An incubator simulates warmth, a ventilator helps the baby breath, and intravenous solutions (in combination with the mother’s milk) help the baby grow. The babies also need human touch, and the parent’s presence is key to their thriving and surviving.

However, this optimum care requires more space. Single patient rooms are the new standard for delivering care to pre-term babies because they provide room for the necessary equipment, for staff and parents, and they provide quiet, which is essential for development. At the moment, the NICU is configured to accommodate multiple beds per room, as well as the equipment necessary for each baby. The rooms are cramped. Sharing the space with multiple care teams increases the chance of infection. It also means a lack of privacy, and does not offer the quiet that is so essential for these tiny babies’ development.

SHARE the HOPE (Donations)

  • Sale
  • $10

Unable to attend? Feel free to make a donation to the event in support of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Ottawa Hospital. 

Tax receipts will be issued for donations over $15.00. Tax receipts will be issued and mailed to the name and address entered at check-out. 

More about the NICU...

Extremely premature babies require complex care, life support, and round-the-clock monitoring until they reach full-term (39 to 40 weeks). For these little babies to grow and develop they need conditions that mimic the mother’s womb: warmth, oxygen, food and quiet. We attempt to recreate these conditions by artificial means. An incubator simulates warmth, a ventilator helps the baby breath, and intravenous solutions (in combination with the mother’s milk) help the baby grow. The babies also need human touch, and the parent’s presence is key to their thriving and surviving.

However, this optimum care requires more space. Single patient rooms are the new standard for delivering care to pre-term babies because they provide room for the necessary equipment, for staff and parents, and they provide quiet, which is essential for development. At the moment, the NICU is configured to accommodate multiple beds per room, as well as the equipment necessary for each baby. The rooms are cramped. Sharing the space with multiple care teams increases the chance of infection. It also means a lack of privacy, and does not offer the quiet that is so essential for these tiny babies’ development.